Review of Plain Dead

 

Plain Dead

Emma Miller

5 Stars

Synopsis:

25310469When a newspaperman is murdered in the Amish community of Stone Mill, Pennsylvania, Rachel Mast digs up the dirt to find out who wanted to bury the lead…

Although she left her Old Order Amish ways in her youth, Rachel discovered corporate life in the English world to be complicated and unfulfilling. Having returned to Stone Mill, she’s happy to be running her own B&B. But she’s also learning—in more ways than one—that the past is not always so easily left behind.

After local newspaperman Bill Billingsly is found gagged and tied to his front porch, left to freeze overnight in a snowstorm, Detective Evan Parks—Rachel’s beau—uncovers a file of scandalous information Billingsly intended to publish, including a record of Rachel pleading no contest to charges of corporate misconduct. Though Evan is certain of her innocence, it’s up to Rachel to find the real killer. A closer examination of the victim’s unpublished report leads Rachel to believe the Amish community is far from sinless. But if she’s not careful her obituary might be the next to appear in print… (Goodreads)

Review:

I have read all of the books in this series and I thought they were all excellent.  All the things that I look for in a cozy are here:  mystery, suspense, romance, and small town feel.  In addition to all of these things, this book is an Amish mystery, which is one of my favorite types.  

The characters are well developed and well rounded.  Rachel is smart and is not afraid to stick her nose into things that really are not any of her business.  But, as we all know, that is the only way to find a killer.  She really does not take a lot of unnecessary chances but she will take every opportunity to go snooping.  I really enjoy the fact that although she is now an Englisher, she still honors the traditions of her Amish family.  

The mystery is well plotted and carried on perfectly throughout the book.  There are suspects to consider and clues to reveal and decipher if the murderer is ever going to get caught.  The method of killing was unique, which I enjoyed.  There are enough twists and turns to make you stop and rethink the culprit a few times.

The writing style flows smoothly and the book is an easy read.  The author is very talented in creating suspense with the written word.  She is talented in giving enough description to allow the reader to get the images in their head but not so much that the book begins to drag.   

I would highly recommend this book (and series) to all those who enjoy a well crafted cozy mystery.  If you like Amish mysteries, this book (and series) is a must read.

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a honest review.  I would like to thank NetGalley and Kensington Books for the opportunity to read and review this book.

When a newspaperman is murdered in the Amish community of Stone Mill, Pennsylvania, Rachel Mast digs up the dirt to find out who wanted to bury the lead…

Although she left her Old Order Amish ways in her youth, Rachel discovered corporate life in the English world to be complicated and unfulfilling. Having returned to Stone Mill, she’s happy to be running her own B&B. But she’s also learning—in more ways than one—that the past is not always so easily left behind.

After local newspaperman Bill Billingsly is found gagged and tied to his front porch, left to freeze overnight in a snowstorm, Detective Evan Parks—Rachel’s beau—uncovers a file of scandalous information Billingsly intended to publish, including a record of Rachel pleading no contest to charges of corporate misconduct. Though Evan is certain of her innocence, it’s up to Rachel to find the real killer. A closer examination of the victim’s unpublished report leads Rachel to believe the Amish community is far from sinless. But if she’s not careful her obituary might be the next to appear in print… (Goodreads)

Review:

I have read all of the books in this series and I thought they were all excellent.  All the things that I look for in a cozy are here:  mystery, suspense, romance, and small town feel.  In addition to all of these things, this book is an Amish mystery, which is one of my favorite types.  

The characters are well developed and well rounded.  Rachel is smart and is not afraid to stick her nose into things that really are not any of her business.  But, as we all know, that is the only way to find a killer.  She really does not take a lot of unnecessary chances but she will take every opportunity to go snooping.  I really enjoy the fact that although she is now an Englisher, she still honors the traditions of her Amish family.  

The mystery is well plotted and carried on perfectly throughout the book.  There are suspects to consider and clues to reveal and decipher if the murderer is ever going to get caught.  The method of killing was unique, which I enjoyed.  There are enough twists and turns to make you stop and rethink the culprit a few times.

The writing style flows smoothly and the book is an easy read.  The author is very talented in creating suspense with the written word.  She is talented in giving enough description to allow the reader to get the images in their head but not so much that the book begins to drag.   

I would highly recommend this book (and series) to all those who enjoy a well crafted cozy mystery.  If you like Amish mysteries, this book (and series) is a must read.

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a honest review.  I would like to thank NetGalley and Kensington Books for the opportunity to read and review this book.

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